Architecture, Travel

Berwick-upon-Tweed

The town on the eastern end of the border between England and Scotland was fought over for centuries.

The old road bridge

With the eventual peace (I hope I don’t speak too soon) a road Bridge was started in 1610 by order of James I of England (VI of Scotland) and finished in 14 years. It cost £15,000 and was to carry the Great North Road, later the A1, between London and Edinburgh and it still carries traffic, albeit one-way but was closed for repairs when we visited recently.

Jacobean Bridge having its parapet repointed.
Looking on is the new road bridge — doing extra work while the old girl is indisposed!
Under her arches her structure is there for all to inspect.

Beyond the two road bridges you can just see the rail bridge — all are quiet as Scotland is only just opening up again after lock-down. The A1 now by-passes the town and crosses the Tweed up river of the town.
Fortified from its years of conflict the town has a sturdy wall along which you can walk.
This was a guard house but not redundant — now a heritage centre.
These beautiful town houses built along the wall look out to sea.
Along the wall you can see the emplacements for the many cannons that guarded the mouth of the Tweed
The other way they guard the harbour, everywhere there is a military air.
But the town hall represents another aspect of this fascinating place — the thriving economic heart of an important border crossing.
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3 thoughts on “Berwick-upon-Tweed

  1. I’ve only viewed Berwick upon Tweed from the main East Coast train line but it always looks so appealing from the train windows that I’d like to stop off there sometime especially now I have read your post.

  2. Brenda Hargreaves says:

    Hi Diana Glad you found Berwick on Tweed as fascinating as I did when I visited it nearly two years ago on a holiday in Northumberland. I’m down in Lyndhurst at the moment.[…] Best wishes to you both Love Brenda X

    Sent from my iPad

    >

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